DAVID COGGAN









Contact Information

Room 422, Wilson Hall
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, TN 37240


david.coggan@vanderbilt.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Research Interests

I am generally interested in how humans visually perceive objects in their environment. A primary focus of my research is to understand how visual cortex transforms raw visual input in order to facilitate object recognition. I am also investigating the role of cortical feedback on neural responses to objects in the lateral geniculate nucleus. I will be using a range of empirical techniques to address these questions, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), psychophysics and computational modelling.


Publications

Coggan, D. D., Giannakopoulou, A., Ali, S., Goz, B., Watson, D. M., Hartley, T., Baker, D. H., & Andrews, T. J. (2019). A data-driven approach to stimulus selection reveals an image-based representation of objects in high-level visual cortex. Human Brain Mapping, pp. 1-16.

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Coggan, D. D., Baker, D. H., & Andrews, T. J. (2019). Selectivity for mid-level properties of faces and places in the fusiform face area and parahippocampal place area. European Journal of Neuroscience, pp. 1-10.

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Coggan, D. D., Allen, L. A., Farrar, O. R. H., Gouws, A. D., Morland, A. B., Baker, D. H., & Andrews, T. J. (2017). Differences in selectivity to natural images in early visual areas ( V1 – V3 ). Scientific Reports, 7(2444), 1-8.

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Coggan, D. D., Baker, D. H., & Andrews, T. J. (2016). The Role of Visual and Semantic Properties in the Emergence of Category-Specific Patterns of Neural Response in the Human Brain. ENeuro, 3(August), ENEURO.0158-16.2016.

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Coggan, D. D., Liu, W., Baker, D. H., & Andrews, T. J. (2016). Category-selective patterns of neural response in the ventral visual pathway in the absence of categorical information.. NeuroImage, 135, 107-114.

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Baker, D. H., Karapanagiotidis, T., Coggan, D. D., Wailes-Newson, K., & Smallwood, J. (2015). Brain networks underlying bistable perception. NeuroImage, 119, 229-234.

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